Hard Work Is Not Going To Break You: A Rant

kettle bells

Hard work helps us to learn skills, to function in challenging circumstances, learn to resist fatigue, and teaches us how to play a sport with passion and intensity. Now, when I bring this up on social media someone always has to post something to the effect of “Yes, but we have to be careful with that message as too much hard work is bad.”   I have some concerns about these types of comments. My concerns center around the fact...

Thoughts on Team Building

I’ve always been a good technical and teaching coach. I have always had a gift for teaching and correcting skills and for the x’s and o’s. What I’ve been challenged with is the team building side of thing; I think it takes time and experience to figure that out.   With this article, I’d like to share some things that I’ve found work for me.   Common experiences: This can also be thought of as shared suffering. The point here...

How To Use Pull-ups In A Team Setting

In a previous post (http://www.cissik.com/blog/2017/10/pull-ups-for-performance-and-injury-prevention/) I wrote about the importance of the pull-up exercise and athletic strength and conditioning. My perspective in that article was why it is important and how to build up the ability to do it. In this post I’d like to talk about how to use the pull-up in a program once someone is able to do pull-ups.   Once an athlete can perform 10-12 pull-ups, it’s time to use this exercise as one of the...

Think About Your Why: Picking Exercises

At the end of the day, the justification for using strength and conditioning for athletes boils down to two things; preventing injuries and improving performance. This is done in an environment where there’s never enough time and there are many athletes training at one time.   As coaches we lose sight of our foci (performance, injury prevention) a lot and we get distracted by exercises and methods that don’t necessarily contribute to either optimally especially given the constraints that we...

Coaching Cues Matter

Coaches are always looking for more effective ways to coach. We all have to learn over the years that our coaching needs to be clear, concise, and memorable. Vern Gambetta calls this being a twitter coach (i.e. avoid speeches and focus on what is needed). But, as coaches we’re always looking for magic cues and drills to get our point across.   Schutts et al have a really interesting article in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research looking at...